COVID-19 Updates 6/25

June 25, 2020
I hope you are all well and that you are staying safe and healthy. I wanted to share with you the latest information and developments on COVID-19.

Hospitalizations for coronavirus/COVID-19 declined by 2 patients from Wednesday. Figures released today show more than 6,500 tests for the virus were conducted yesterday with 81 showing positive.

Data updates on testing in Connecticut

A county-by-county breakdown includes:


 

County

COVID-19 Cases

COVID-19 Deaths

COVID-19 Hospitalizations

Confirmed

Probable

Confirmed

Probable

Fairfield County

15,914

633

1,069

304

46

Hartford County

10,806

677

1,051

311

25

Litchfield County

1,406

63

116

20

1

Middlesex County

1,218

59

141

38

8

New Haven County

11,852

393

918

150

39

New London County

1,157

62

76

26

2

Tolland County

829

70

50

14

0

Windham County

586

9

13

1

1

Pending address validation

250

10

0

0

0

Total

44,018

1,976

3,434

864

122

 

For several additional graphs and tables containing more data, including a list of cases in every municipality, click here.

Stamford Specific Updates

As of 4:00 p.m. on June 25th — Stamford has 3,265 confirmed cases of COVID-19, compared to 3,263 confirmed cases on June 24th.

Governor Lamont signs 56th executive order to mitigate the spread of COVID-19

Governor Lamont today signed another executive order – the 56th since he enacted the emergency declarations – that builds upon his efforts to encourage mitigation strategies that slow down transmission of the virus. Executive Order No. 7CCC enacts the following provisions:

  • Clarification of time periods in Executive Order No. 7I: Clarifies the authority granted to allow boards of assessment appeals to extend deadlines to file tax assessment appeals to ensure that grand lists are completed on time.
  • Extension of time for fire service personnel examinations: Modifies regulations in order to extend by 180 days the date by which examinations for fire service personnel must be completed.
  • Issuance of duplicate licenses and identity cards: Modifies regulations in order to waive for six months the requirement that customers appear in person at the Department of Motor Vehicles to obtain a duplicate license or identification.
Back to School

Governor Ned Lamont and Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona today announced details of the framework to allow all students – in all school districts statewide – the opportunity to have access to in-school, full-time instruction at the beginning of the 2020-21 academic year, as long as public health data continues to support this model. While Connecticut has determined reopening schools for in-person instruction can be achieved based upon the state’s successful COVID-19 containment efforts, this model will be supported with more intensive mitigation strategies and specific monitoring, containment, and class cancellation plans.


 
Framework for Connecticut Schools During the 2020-21 Academic Year

Guiding Principles

As Connecticut schools plan to reopen, the guidance and considerations outlined in this framework are grounded in six guiding principles:

  1. Safeguarding the health and safety of students and staff;
  2. Allowing all students the opportunity to return into the classrooms full time starting in the fall;
  3. Monitoring the school populations and, when necessary, potentially cancelling classes in the future to appropriately contain COVID-19 spread;
  4. Emphasizing equity, access, and support to the students and communities who are emerging from this historic disruption;
  5. Fostering strong two-way communication with partners such as families, educators and staff; and
  6. Factoring into decisions about reopening the challenges to the physical safety and social-emotional well-being of our students when they are not in school.

These guiding principles require all districts to develop their plans with a certain level of consistency, however they retain wide discretion in implementing approaches to reopening given unique local considerations. School districts must balance their planning with contingency plans to provide robust, blended learning or remote learning for all grades in the event that a school, district, or region has to cancel or limit in-person classes due to health precautions.

Main Operational Considerations

Cohorting

  • Districts should emphasize grouping students by the same class/group of students and teacher (into a cohort) so each team functions independently as much as possible. Consider this methodology by grade levels.
  • Placing students in cohorts is strongly encouraged for grades K-8, and encouraged where feasible for grades 9-12.

Social Distancing and Facilities

  • Review building space and reconfigure available classroom space, such as gymnasiums and auditoriums, to maximize social distancing, consistent with public health guidelines in place at that time.

Transportation

  • Districts should plan for buses to operate close to capacity with heightened health and safety protocols, including requiring all students and operators wear face coverings.
  • Plans must be developed to activate increased social distancing protocols based upon community spread.

Face Coverings

  • All staff and students will be expected to wear a protective face covering or face mask that completely covers the nose and mouth when inside the school building, except for certain exceptions including when teachers are providing instruction.

Ensuring Equity and Access

  • Equitable access to education is a top priority that supports a full-time in-school model by mitigating any barriers to education or opportunity gaps that increased during the pandemic. Efforts to support equity, close the opportunity gap, and provide a wide range of support for students in the state is best achieved with in-person schooling opportunities for all ages.
  • Districts should identify gaps and develop action plans for reopening that specifically address inclusion, equity, and access for all learners with strategies and clearly defined action steps.